Posts Tagged ‘spinecor research’

Effective Scoliosis Treatment

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

Scoliosis is a an abnormal lateral curve to the vertebral column.  The degree of scoliosis can range from mild to severe. Scoliosis is most commonly an incidental and harmless finding. Patients with milder curves may only need to visit their doctor for periodic observation. Scoliosis may be congenital (a birth defect) or acquired (degenerative, arthritic, or traumatic).

Majority of the scoliosis cases are known as idiopathic. Since the true cause is unknown, the treatment can only be based on the symptoms. Until now, only two types of treatment have been known to be efficient: the first is the treatment using an orthopaedic rigid brace and the second one is surgery with a spinal system. Unfortunately only a few treatments have actually been shown to affect the outcome of scoliosis.

The treatment options of scoliosis depend on the severity and the age of the person.  Scoliosis bracing has been shown to be an effective method to prevent curves from getting worse. Until recently, this treatment was reserved for children and adolescents in whom the prediction of a rapid increase in the curve needs to be thwarted.  Today, there is spinecor, a revolutionary new soft flexible scoliosis brace that has changed the way we look at scoliosis treatment both in kids and adults.

SpineCor changes the dynamic of the trunk while harmonizing the posture. It is a therapeutic means with less mechanical constraints and an acceptable comfort level that preserves and enhances movements with a double therapeutic action:   Progressive correction of the spine deformation and Neuro-muscular stimulation and correction.

The design of SpineCor happened through a scientific process based on decades of knowledge on scoliosis and its treatment. Therefore, we can be optimistic about its efficiency.  Before spinecor there were Rigid bracing sucah as the Boston Brace, the Providence Brace, and the Wilmington Brace which all utilize a three point pressure system to reduce the cobb angle measurement. Dynamic bracing, such as SpineCor, uses muscle activity to enhance cortical activation while encouraging the bodies natural reflexes to improve muscle recruitment patterns, thereby potentially rehabilitating the postural support systems.
 

 

Spinecor Treatment Approach

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

SpineCor  treatment was developed in the early 1990s and utilises a Dynamic Corrective Brace (DCB), together with a completely new treatment approach requiring clinical assistant diagnostic software (SAS) to allow accurate fitting and treatment follow up.

Following 12 years of clinical research and trials, SpineCor is now rapidly being made available to patients around the world and by the leading provider http://www.scoliosisspecialists.com/ in the USA.  The initial excellent clinical results produced by the research centre at Ste Justine Hospital and the University of Montreal, Canada, have since been replicated by more than 80 other treatment centres around the world. SpineCor has shown to be effective in 89% of cases (either by stablisation or improvement in (Cobb) angle of the curve).

SpineCor’s unique treatment approach offers improvement over traditional braces, which are essentially static or allow minimal movement, due to its true totally dynamic action. Fundamental research by independent research groups now indicates that a significant dynamic action is required on the spine (vertebral growth plates) to alter the abnormal growth progressing the deformity in scoliosis patients.

The SpineCor treatment approach is completely different to that of traditional braces that use 3-point pressure and distraction; it is the first and only true dynamic bracing system for idiopathic scoliosis. SpineCor’s unique approach to treatment by global postural re-education has been shown to give progressive correction over time which, unlike any previous brace treatment, is extremely stable post brace weaning.

Survival analysis of the first weaned patients treated with the SpineCor brace

Monday, November 2nd, 2009
Rivard CH, Coillard C, Zabjek KF Research Centre, Sainte-Justine Hospital, 3175 chemin de la Coˆ te Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3T 1C5.
Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the success of treatment during the follow-up of a group of consecutively treated Idiopathic Scoliosis (IS) patients treated with the SpineCor brace 
Methods: A survival analysis was performed on 68 patients who had terminated treatment from a cohort of 200 consecutively treated patients with the SpineCor since 1994. A survival analysis was performed to estimate the probability of success at 1, 2, 3, 4 years post-treatment without brace. The difference between the initial radiological Cobb angle, and the last available Cobb angle during follow-up without brace was used to define a failure (aggravation of 5 degrees more) or success (stabilization, correction). The patient cohort was categorized as either less than 30 (G1), and greater than 30 (G2).
Results: For the total group of patients (Initial Cobb angle: 30 9) the trend during treatment wasa decrease in spinal curvature at three months with a mean difference of 9 (SD: 6), at termination of treatment (time ¼ 23 months) a mean difference of 5 (SD: 7); and at a follow-up time of 1, 2, 3 and 4 years there was a difference of 2  (SD: 7), 6  (SD: 5), 0  (SD: 8), and 8  (SD: 4) in reference to the initial condition. The survival analysis (G1 and G2) indicated a cumulative probability of success during follow-up without brace as follows. Year 1: probability (p) ¼ 1.00, 57

Abstracts (Confidence Interval (CI): 1.00 to 1.00) for G1,  p¼ 1.00 (CI: 1.00 to 1.00) for G2; Year 2: (p) ¼ 0.98 (CI: 0.93 to 1.00) for G1,  p¼ 0.92 (CI: 0.82 to 1.00) for G2; Year 3: p ¼0.92 (CI: 0.83 to 1.00) for G1, p¼ 0.92 (CI: 0.83 to 1.00) for G2; Year 4:  p¼ 0.88 (CI: 0.76 to 0.99) for G1, p ¼ 0.92 (CI: 0.73 to 1.00) for G2.

Conclusions: This initial cohort of patients demonstrated a  general trend of initial decrease in spinal curvature in brace, followed by a stabilization and/or correction at the end of treatment which was maintained through 1, 2, 3, and 4 years follow-up.

 

 

The SpineCor System

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

The SpineCor system is a flexible brace that is principally prescribed for Idiopathic Scoliosis patients with a Cobb angle between 15° and 50° and Risser sign 0 to 3.  The brace is fitted on the patient in accordance to a sub-classification of the traditional SRS definition of curve types.  The SpineCor Assistant Software guides the treatment provider through the fitting process.  The brace is prescribed to be worn by the patients 20 out of 24 hours per day until they have reached maturity, with radiological evaluations performed prior to and immediately following the fitting of the brace, and every 4 to 6 months afterwards.  To accommodate for growth and postural changes, corrective bands need to be adjusted frequently and require replacement each 6-12 months for optimum brace performance.

Evolution of scoliosis

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

Still, today, 80% of the scoliosis cases are known as idiopathic. Since the true cause is unknown, the treatment can only be based on the symptoms. Until now, only two types of treatment have been known to be efficient: the first is the treatment using an orthopaedic rigid brace and the second one is surgery with a spinal system.

In both cases, the therapeutic benefits can unfortunately be associated with non-negligible drawbacks that limit their uses.  Because of a better understanding of the risk associated and of the disease evolution, we have seen a shift towards earlier treatment.

The correlation between growth potential of the child, and, more specifically, of the adolescent, and the evolution of the scoliosis has been clearly established. It was demonstrated by Duval-Beaupère  and many others [inc. . This means that the earlier the scoliosis appears, the greater the risks of evolution. Lonstein & Carlson analysed the natural evolution of scoliosis in a population of 729 adolescents. They concluded that a child with an angle between 20° and 29° and a Risser of 0,1 or 2, will see his/her scoliosis evolve in 68% of the cases. Stagnara and Clarisse and other authors have named the 30° limit “the critical limit” because, beyond this point, during high velocity growth periods, evolution of the disease is guaranteed.

Effectiveness of the SpineCor brace

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Title:
Effectiveness of the SpineCor brace based on the new standardized criteria proposed by the S.R.S. for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
Published:
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, June 2007, P. 375-379
Authors:
Coillard C
Vachon V
Circo C
Beauséjour M
Rivard CH

JPOS Spinal Core Paper.pdf

Survival analysis of a group of 365 idiopathic scoliosis patients treated with the Dynamic SpineCor Brace

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Title:
Survival analysis of a group of 365 idiopathic scoliosis patients treated with the Dynamic SpineCor Brace
Published:
Résonances Eurospéenes Du Rachis. 14(43):p. 1782-1786. French.
Authors:
Vachon V
Coillard C
Zabjek KF
Rhalmi S
Rivard CH

Survival-Analysis2006.pdf

Standardization of criteria for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis brace studies

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Title:
Standardization of criteria for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis brace studies: SRS Committee on Bracing and Nonoperative Management
Published:
Spine, v. 30, no. 18, p. 2068-2075.
Authors:
Richards BS
Bernstein RM
D’Amato CR
Thompson GH

Richardsetal2005.pdf

SPINECOR: A non-rigid brace for the treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis: Initial Post-Treatment Results.

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Title:
SPINECOR: A non-rigid brace for the treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis: Initial Post-Treatment Results.
Published:
Eurospine 2003 12: 141-1
Authors:
Christine Coillard, M.D.
Michel A Leroux, Ph.D.
Karl F Zabjek, MSc.
Charles Hilaire Rivard, M.D.

posttreatmentresults.pdf

SPINECOR: a new therapeutic approach for idiopathic scoliosis

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Title:
SPINECOR: a new therapeutic approach for idiopathic scoliosis
Published:
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2002; 88:215-7.
Authors:
Coillard C
Leroux MA
Badeaux J
Rivard CH

Coillard_et_al2002_New_Therapeutic_Approach.pdf


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